East Bristol Bakery

112 St. Marks Rd, Easton, Bristol, BS5 6JD.

The East Bristol Bakery is a small award winning craft bakery in the heart of Easton, Bristol, UK.

We open Tuesday to Saturday.
9am to 7pm during the week.
9am until we sell out on Saturdays, arrive early to avoid disapointment!

We make high quality traditional breads, seasonal specials, and tasty sweet treats that include Vegan, dairy free and wheat free offerings.

These are my photos of what's coming out of the oven!

*Winner of 'BEST LOCAL BAKERY' at the 2014 Bristol Good Food Awards*

*National Farm Shop and Deli Awards BAKER OF THE YEAR 2014*


*Winner of BEST LOCAL CAKE 2013 at the Bristol Good Food Awards*

Some photos from an early morning with Leonie and Polly. 
I shot these thinking it was black and white film in my camera but the colours came out looking great anyway.

I was looking through some old photos from when we first opened in October 2012. It’s crazy to think how much has changed in just 2 years, and how far we’ve come! Here’s a photo from our opening week and one I took a few weeks ago. It’s amazing to me to compare the two.

The changes didn’t happen suddenly, we just kept working hard and expanding as we could. It’s important to remember how much hard work it took to get to this point, and to focus on maintaining that drive. I’ve been reflecting a lot on this recently because it all happened in such a whirlwind that it’s so easy to forget.

Most importantly of course it’s important to think about how much support we had in the early days from loyal customers who still come in today. We wouldn’t be going so strong today if it wasn’t for everyone who comes in, we appreciate all our brilliant customers! Thank you everyone! 

The other morning we had my friend Francesca Jones come and take some pictures in the bakery. We’ve been friends for years and I’ve always been a big fan of her work. You can check her out on her website, but her tumblr blog is regularly updated with her portrait work.

circle triangle square? on Flickr.
This is a little bit of a secret, but when I decided that I was going to open a bakery I took the first tin I bought and hammered a circle, triangle and square into it. These symbols are significant to me for many reasons, but the act of imprinting them into one loaf every day appeals to my mischievous side.  Every day one person takes home a loaf with these markings stamped into the bottom, and in the year that we’ve been open only one person has mentioned it. When we take the freshly baked loaves out of the tins I like to spot the marked loaf and wonder who’ll be enjoying that bread today.

circle triangle square? on Flickr.

This is a little bit of a secret, but when I decided that I was going to open a bakery I took the first tin I bought and hammered a circle, triangle and square into it. These symbols are significant to me for many reasons, but the act of imprinting them into one loaf every day appeals to my mischievous side.

Every day one person takes home a loaf with these markings stamped into the bottom, and in the year that we’ve been open only one person has mentioned it. When we take the freshly baked loaves out of the tins I like to spot the marked loaf and wonder who’ll be enjoying that bread today.

(Source: eastbrisbakery)

cheese bread on Flickr.Polly made this happen today! Our first cheesy loaf. Perfect for picnics

cheese bread on Flickr.

Polly made this happen today! Our first cheesy loaf. Perfect for picnics

Spelt sourdough on Flickr.
Had a slice of our Spelt Sourdough with my lunch today. Baked on Saturday, but 2 days later still as fresh as the morning it came out of the oven!

Spelt sourdough on Flickr.

Had a slice of our Spelt Sourdough with my lunch today. Baked on Saturday, but 2 days later still as fresh as the morning it came out of the oven!

fuckyeahbristol:

(via Call out for creatives to make use of disused council buildings)

CALL TO ARTISTS!!!

Bristol City Council’s temporary creative space project is open to proposals from creative practitioners to use The Control Room and The Edwardian Cloakroom during the autumn season (September – November 2014). Proposal forms can be downloaded on here.

We invite proposals for visual art, installation, musical and performance projects. We are particularly interested in proposals which respond to the spaces and their unusual qualities as ex functional council buildings.

Application Deadline: Thursday 26th June 2014

Successful proposals will be selected by 17thJuly and listed here from the beginning of August.

I don’t usually retweet, but this is a brilliant opportunity. Over a the years I’ve seen some great stuff in this space, let the high quality continue.

At the start of this month Bristol hosted the first ever Food Connections Festival.
The festival was a city wide celebration of food and conversation that lasted over 10 days and included over 150 separate events.
To me the festival was an opportunity to talk about where are food comes from, to consider the complex networks and events that makes getting food onto our tables possible. To talk to people about what we eat, and where it comes from.
As a baker I use only 4 basic ingredients - Flour, Water, Salt and Yeast.With just four ingredients is should be possible to say exactly where they come from, but I realised I couldn’t. The festival gave me a reason to produce something which I could say exactly where all the ingredients came from. This became known as the #ConnectedLoaf. 
I chose to make a loaf of bread entirely made of ingredients sourced from the South West, where I’d met the producers of each ingredient, and I’d travelled all the food miles myself. I decided to cycle the journey because this would be hard work and nothing could be taken for granted.
Starting at Lands End I cycled back to Bristol over 6 days, and covering 300miles.
My first ingredient was Sea Salt from the Cornish Sea Salt Company.Then I collected Honey from a small producer in Devon.My bread was risen with a Sourdough Culture from Tracebridge Sourdough.The flour was Organic Spelt flour grown in Glastonbury by Sharpham Park. Finally even the water was collected from Cheddar Natural Spring Water.
You can hear the story, and follow my journey by listening back to the BBC Food Programme.
I used these ingredients for the duration of the festival, baking my #ConnectedLoaf and telling the stories behind the producers that made it possible.
The ultimate point was that in our day to day lives it is easy to take things like Salt or Water for granted, but there are people who are really passionate about those basic things. Without those people we wouldn’t have quality salt, organic flour, pure untreated water etc.
Bristol Food Connections gave me an excuse to take this idea to an extreme. I know it’s not possible to work or think like this all the time, but sometimes it’s important to sit back and consider - who makes this one ingredient that I can’t imagine living without?
One of the things that concerns me about modern life is how detached we’ve become from our food, and each other. Many of us have no way of having a connection with the butcher who prepared our Sunday chicken. The way we work at our bakery invites people to have that connection with us. The person who sells you your bread, is the person who’s made that bread. This project was me taking that a bit further to our producers, and I feel much richer as an individual for that.
As I’ve said, this was taken as an extreme on purpose, but I would hope that the people who take this bread and those who’ve read this blog, will take that on board a little and seek ways of connecting themselves.
Take the time to think about that one ingredient, or that one thing which you use all the time but don’t have a clue how it’s made. Try to bridge that gap, even if it’s just by finding out exactly where it comes from. The experience may well be enlightening, or perhaps disturbing, and possibly life changing.

At the start of this month Bristol hosted the first ever Food Connections Festival.

The festival was a city wide celebration of food and conversation that lasted over 10 days and included over 150 separate events.

To me the festival was an opportunity to talk about where are food comes from, to consider the complex networks and events that makes getting food onto our tables possible. To talk to people about what we eat, and where it comes from.

As a baker I use only 4 basic ingredients - Flour, Water, Salt and Yeast.
With just four ingredients is should be possible to say exactly where they come from, but I realised I couldn’t. The festival gave me a reason to produce something which I could say exactly where all the ingredients came from. This became known as the #ConnectedLoaf

I chose to make a loaf of bread entirely made of ingredients sourced from the South West, where I’d met the producers of each ingredient, and I’d travelled all the food miles myself. I decided to cycle the journey because this would be hard work and nothing could be taken for granted.

Starting at Lands End I cycled back to Bristol over 6 days, and covering 300miles.

My first ingredient was Sea Salt from the Cornish Sea Salt Company.
Then I collected Honey from a small producer in Devon.
My bread was risen with a Sourdough Culture from Tracebridge Sourdough.
The flour was Organic Spelt flour grown in Glastonbury by Sharpham Park
Finally even the water was collected from Cheddar Natural Spring Water.

You can hear the story, and follow my journey by listening back to the BBC Food Programme.

I used these ingredients for the duration of the festival, baking my #ConnectedLoaf and telling the stories behind the producers that made it possible.

The ultimate point was that in our day to day lives it is easy to take things like Salt or Water for granted, but there are people who are really passionate about those basic things. Without those people we wouldn’t have quality salt, organic flour, pure untreated water etc.

Bristol Food Connections gave me an excuse to take this idea to an extreme. I know it’s not possible to work or think like this all the time, but sometimes it’s important to sit back and consider - who makes this one ingredient that I can’t imagine living without?

One of the things that concerns me about modern life is how detached we’ve become from our food, and each other. Many of us have no way of having a connection with the butcher who prepared our Sunday chicken. The way we work at our bakery invites people to have that connection with us. The person who sells you your bread, is the person who’s made that bread. This project was me taking that a bit further to our producers, and I feel much richer as an individual for that.

As I’ve said, this was taken as an extreme on purpose, but I would hope that the people who take this bread and those who’ve read this blog, will take that on board a little and seek ways of connecting themselves.

Take the time to think about that one ingredient, or that one thing which you use all the time but don’t have a clue how it’s made. Try to bridge that gap, even if it’s just by finding out exactly where it comes from. The experience may well be enlightening, or perhaps disturbing, and possibly life changing.

Crazy busy bake this morning but I love it when everything comes out of the oven looking exactly how we like it. Best feeling ever

untitled on Flickr.Polly really made me proud this morning. Perfect baguette bake!

untitled on Flickr.

Polly really made me proud this morning. Perfect baguette bake!